sizeighty

archiemcphee:

Some things are so awesomely enormous that it’s difficult to grasp just how big they are until they’re put into a more relatable perspective. Today, thanks to Belgian amateur astronomer Michel (@quark1972), we get to appreciate the size of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko (aka the rubber ducky comet).
This is the comet that the ESA’s Rosetta spacecraft reached on August 6, 2014 after a ten year, five month and four day-long journey nearly 4 million miles into space. The Rosetta will now spend the next two years studying the comet, including the deployment of a lander, the Philae, down to the comet’s surface.
Head over to the ESA website to learn lots more about this amazing mission.
[via io9]

archiemcphee:

Some things are so awesomely enormous that it’s difficult to grasp just how big they are until they’re put into a more relatable perspective. Today, thanks to Belgian amateur astronomer Michel (@quark1972), we get to appreciate the size of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko (aka the rubber ducky comet).

This is the comet that the ESA’s Rosetta spacecraft reached on August 6, 2014 after a ten year, five month and four day-long journey nearly 4 million miles into space. The Rosetta will now spend the next two years studying the comet, including the deployment of a lander, the Philae, down to the comet’s surface.

Head over to the ESA website to learn lots more about this amazing mission.

[via io9]

archiemcphee:

What could possibly be better than a pile of LEGOs, each tiny piece so full of potential? How about LEGO bricks made of mouthwatering chocolate? Yep, that’ll do it. These awesome, completely functional and 100% edible Chocolate LEGO bricks are the work of Japanese illustrator and designer Akihiro Mizuuchi.

The bricks are made by pouring melted chocolate into precisely designed molds. After the chocolate has cooled, the edible LEGOs can be popped out of the molds and used just like regular LEGO bricks. That is, until you’re overcome by the urge to start eating them.

Now we’re one step closer to living in a Land of Chocolate.

[via Colossal]

(via goodstuffhappenedtoday)

spring-of-mathematics:

Mathematically Correct Breakfast - How to Slice a Bagel into Two Linked Halves. If a torus is cut by a Möbius strip it will split up into to interlocking rings.

It is not hard to cut a bagel into two equal halves which are linked like two links of a chain. Figure 1:

  1. To start, you must visualize four key points.  Center the bagel at the origin, circling the Z axis. A is the highest point above the +X axis.  B is where the +Y axis enters the bagel. C is the lowest point below the -X axis.  D is where the -Y axis exits the bagel.
  2. These sharpie markings on the bagel are just to help visualize the geometry and the points.  You don’t need to actually write on the bagel to cut it properly.
  3. The line ABCDA, which goes smoothly through all four key points, is the cut line.  As it goes 360 degrees around the Z axis, it also goes 360 degrees around the bagel.
  4. The red line is like the black line but is rotated 180 degrees (around Z or through the hole). An ideal knife could enter on the black line and come out exactly opposite, on the red line. But in practice, it is easier to cut in halfway on both the black line and the red line. The cutting surface is a two-twist Mobius strip; it has two sides, one for each half.
  5. After being cut, the two halves can be moved but are still linked together, each passing through the hole of the other.

It is much more fun to put cream cheese on these bagels than on an ordinary bagel. In additional to the intellectual stimulation, you get more cream cheese, because there is slightly more surface area.
Topology problem: Modify the cut so the cutting surface is a one-twist Mobius strip. (You can still get cream cheese into the cut, but it doesn’t separate into two parts). See more at: Mathematically Correct Breakfast: How to Slice a Bagel into Two Linked Halves by George W. Hart.

Images: How to Slice a Bagel into Two Linked Halves by George W. Hart - Cutting bagels into linked halves on Mathematica. - Interlocking Bagel Rings

Maybe, that’s one of the reasons why I love bagel :)

(via thisistheverge)

archiemcphee:

We can’t stop staring at this indescribably awesome AT-ST cat tree. It was made by Roxy’s Dream, a small Douglassville, PA-based company that creates high quality custom pet furniture. Their kitties really appear to be getting into the villainous spirit of chicken walker operation. Pew pew!

Visit the Roxy’s Dream Facebook page for more photos of this spectacularly geeky cat tree as well as many of their other custom pet furniture creations.

[via theGrue.com]

French supermarket chain Intermarche launched this promotional campaign to help reduce food waste from “undesirable” fruits and vegetables. Rather than throw out ugly, deformed, or damaged produce, Intermarche instead sells them with a unique twist.

(Source: wimp.com, via goodstuffhappenedtoday)